Grist Mill GPX Download Updated!


Updated Version (April 2012) Ready In The Downloads Window!

There is a new updated version of the Grist Mill GPX file available in the Downloads area on the right side menu!  I have added all of the Ohio and Indiana mills plus made repairs to older entries that proved to be incorrect!  Please download them and install on your GPS!

As ALWAYS please share the lat/long, name, location, address and description of any mills that you find that are NOT on this download!!

Glade Creek Grist Mill, WV

Thanks for your continued help.

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The 3 Faces of Infrared Conversions…


Or, which way should you jump?

Different Spectrum Choices...

Recently, I have been asked several times in emails and via reader comments on which Infrared camera conversion is the best for someone who is planning on jumping into IR!  So, it is time to address that small question…

There are three ways to go when considering Infrared Photography:

  1. Normal color camera with external IR filter.  This is the cheapest way to try your hand at IR photography.  You simply adda 720nm filter to your lens.
  2. Internal conversion to Infrared. This is the cheapest easy way to get into IR.  The internal IR blocking filter (hot mirror) is replaced with a IR pass filter.
  3. Full Spectrum conversion.  This is the best way to get into IR, but the most expensive.  The hot mirror is replaced with clear glass and you put IR filters on the lens.

Let’s discuss each option..

  • The first, normal color camera with a 720nm external filter will work great, but it does have some major issues to overcome.  The exposure times are greatly increased due to the fact that you have limited the amount of light reaching the sensor with the addition of the external filter plus it must overcome the internal hot mirror built into the camera.  The results in exposure time around a minute long and no ability to compose (unless you have live view) because your eyes cannot see through the 720nm external filter.  Focus is off and must be adjusted for IR as well.  Still, it is a good way to see if you even like IR work!
  • The second, internal conversion is a really good way to go.  It requires no special camera functionality (you do not need live view) and will give the ability to shoot normal hand held exposures. It works well in all camera types.  They only issue is the decision on which filter to choose!  I usually tell people to go with a 590nm conversion (Goldie or Super Color) because it gives the best combination of Faux Color and B&W work.  There is another consideration to the internal conversion, it is that you can change the flavor of the conversion by adding an additional filter on the end of your camera lens!  You can only go down in frequency  (up in nm) from whatever your internal filter is but it can be done allowing a different flavor for your camera!  Remember when you hit 720nm or lower you loose the ability to use your optical viewing path so you MUST have a camera with some sort of live view system for this to work! I have a Panasonic GH2 at 590nm, a Canon 20D at 590nm and they both work great.
  • The third option, Full spectrum gives you the most versatility but with added costs.  The hot mirror is replaced with a clear piece of glass and you then program the camera with an external filter!  This opens up an entire world for you to explore.  The camera will see everything from UV to FULL COLOR to INFRARED!  You simply tell it what you wish by your choice of external filter.  If you only are interested in 590 nm, 620 nm and 665 nm then any digital camera will be fine for you.  But if you wish to explore some of the alternatives, like the Super Blue (in camera Faux) or  UV+IR (UG1) or the deep IR filters like 720nm (standard), 850nm (deep IR) and lower then you MUST have a camera with live view or full time LCD display!  The reason for this is the fact that normal DSLR camera systems use an OPTICAL image path that goes from the viewfinder thru a prism, bounces off a mirror and out thru the lens and filter!  If your filter is dark then you cannot see to compose although the camera will still focus!  Live view will allow you to overcome this problem.  There are some REALLY interesting filters out there like the UG1 (UV+IR) and the 047B (Super Blue in camera Faux) that will only work with an internal or Full Spectrum conversion but need a live view with the Full Spectrum Conversion!  Now, the additional costs are the prices of the external filters to fit your lenses.  The darker the filter the more they cost!  Oh, did I mention that with a Full Spectrum Conversion you can convert the camera back to normal color by adding a UV/IR blocking filter (expensive)!!

Spectrum choices

UG1 – UV+IR  This is an interesting filter that mixes UV and Infrared to give ultra white colored leaves and a dark blue or purple sky!  You will see a lot of this posted around the net but very little in the galleries!  It is not for everyone but still can be very pretty and interesting.  The filter is very expensive!  It is around $120 for 58mm.

Hoya 047B Super Blue

Super Blue – In Camera Faux Color.  This filter is becoming more popular as you can shoot normal Faux Color IR images right in the camera with no post processing. It is highly dependent upon good white balance but gives very good Faux Color images.  For B&W it is not so good… The cost of the Tiffen 047B is around $70 in 58mm. Lifepixel now offers a Super Blue internal conversion service.

B+W 090 Super Color 590nm

Super Color (Goldie) – 590nm.  This is (and should be) usually the filter of choice for most IR shooters.  It gives great gold toned Faux Color images and stunning B&W images as well.  For Faux Color special post processing is required in Photoshop and the Red and Blue channels must be swapped which is VERY difficult in Elements but simple in Photoshop CS5!  The cost for a B+W 090 590nm filter is about $25 for 58mm.

B+W 091 Pinkie, 630nm

Pinkie – 630nm.  This is my personal favorite filter for Infrared work.  Instead of golds it gives pinks and reds in Faux Color and stunning B&W work.  No on offers this filter as an internal conversion so the only way to use it is with a Full Spectrum conversion.  The same post processing rules that apply to 590nm apply to 630nm.  The cost is about $25 for 58mm for the B+W 091 590nm filter.

Enhanced Color – 665nm.  This is very close to the 630nm filter but with more reds than pinks.  B&W is stunning and this filter can be had on both the internal conversion and the Full Spectrum Conversion.  The cost is slightly higher at about $50 for 58mm. You will find a lot of P&S cameras on EBay with this conversion.

Hoya R72 720nm Standard IR Filter

Standard – 720nm.  This is called standard for good reason, most IR conversions out there are at 720nm which really does not make any sense to me! It gives very LIMITED Faux color but great B&W!  The filter is black to normal vision and while it works great as an internal conversion it is not so good with Full Spectrum unless you are using it on a camera with live view or full time live view like a Micro 4/3, P&S or any of the other mirror less systems out there.  With a DSLR with live view it works great in Full Spectrum.  The cost is expensive at around $100 for a 58mm version of the Hoya R72.

Deep IR – 850nm.  This filter is totally black.  It gives ZERO Faux Color but beautiful rich and deep B&W images.  This is for the person who only wants to work in B&W.  Even with an internal conversion there will be about a 3 stop hit in exposure do the the limiting factors of the filter.  With a DSLR with live view it works great in Full Spectrum.  The cost is expensive at around $150 for a 58mm version.

LDP CC1 UV/IR Blocking Filter

IR Blocking – Normal Color.  This filter has a aqua appearance that blocks the UV/IR spectrum which will convert your camera back to normal color AS LONG AS YOUR CAMERA IS A FULL SPECTRUM conversion!  This is VERY expensive around $200 for 58mm for the LDP CC1 Filter. I have found that if you couple this filter with the B+W 486 UV/IR blocking filter that you get a better return to normal color.  The reason is that it blocks slightly more on the UV end of things.  I usually dissemble the 486 and install it in the CC1 filter ring along with the CC1 filter.  Again, this is expensive at about $125 for a 58mm.

As you can see, there are a lot of choices out there for you.  The Full Spectrum Conversion has much more options but requires a live view capable camera system.  I have both internal conversions and Full Spectrum conversions and like them both.  I really like playing with the Super Blue you must remember that it does not do well with B&W work!

There are endless examples of images created with each of these filters spread out in this blog.  Go take a look around to see the examples of each to help you decide on which way you might jump!

Please let me know what you decide upon!

The Hammond & Gilbert Mills In Rhode Island


The Gilbert Stuart Museum & Mills

In Color, Infrared and B&W

The Hammond & Gilbert Mills

The Hammond & Gilbert Mills

The Hammond Mill, Selective Focus

I would like to draw your attention to a specific Grist Mill in Rhode Island!  This is the Hammond and Gilbert Mills at the Gilbert Stuart Museum.  What is so unusual about them is the fact that they are 50 feet apart on the same creek feed!  The Gilbert Mill was a Snuff Mill with living quarters for the family above the mill.  The Hammond Mill is and was a standard Grist Mill.  Both Mills are in AMAZING condition and the location just screams “Photograph Me“!    Location is a little in the back country but well worth the drive.  If you would like directions then download the Mills GPX file in the download window to the right!

The Gilbert Mill

The Mills are full of promise!  Look for detail shots as well as wide angle shots.  If you arrive mid day then you will likely be only able to shoot in Infrared (hey, not exactly a bad thing, you think?)  I think that early morning would be the best.  There is a nice standing pond behind the mills for reflection shots and the water path below the mills is actually a fish ladder to aid in migration! As I said, VERY PRETTY!

I shot these images using a Panasonic GH2 Micro 4/3 camera body (Color) and the Pansaonic 14-140mm lens.  For the Infrared shots I used my Olympus E-PL1 Full Spectrum Infrared camera body with the Olympus 14-150mm lens and an external (on the lens) B+W 091 630nm IR filter.  Since the previous post has a lengthy description and recipe for post processing these IR images I am going to leave the same out of this post!

Again, I am going to place all of the images of these amazing mills in a photo album below and all you have to do is to click on any image to bring up the slide show!

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I hope that you enjoy this collection of a VERY unusual Mill!  

Please let me know what you think!

Added Grist Mill GPX and Covered Bridge GPX Updated Files!


Go Get Them!

Glade Creek Mill, WV

There are two new downloads for your GPS system in the download box!  I added the Covered Bridges in Georgia and several NEW and corrected Grist Mill locations!

These are in the GPX file format and can be downloaded from here from the download menu on the lower right menu.

Once you have them on your computer you will need to have the GPS software that camera with your personal GPS to download them into your GPS.

Once done they will be available for you while you travel around the country!

As Always, I would appreciate ANY help that any of your could offer in expanding this database!  So far there are 185 Grist Mill locations and I would like to double that by the end of the year.

Send the following information to have it included in the Database:

  • Mill or Bridge name
  • Address
  • State
  • Lat/Long (IMPORTANT)
  • Description
  • Info on ownership and contact info if on private property.
  • You name and email
  • Best time of day and season for photographing them
  • Image if possible

You Do NOT have to spend a fortune to do IR!


How To Do It On The Cheap!

 

I know, this was supposed to be a post on the GH2 tests but I have been getting a lot of email and comments about the assumed high cost of getting into Infrared Photography!  This insane notion needed to be stopped before it got any further!

If you have an extra camera system laying around you can reasonably expect to send it off for conversion for $200-$300.  Yes that is a lot of money but the expansion of your artistic mind set that Infrared will give you will be worth it.  But there is a cheaper way!

EBay is a great place to find used digital camera systems already converted to Infrared!  I have purchased several of these used IR camera systems in the past year for next to nothing and have NEVER had a problem with a single one that came from EBay!

So far I have purchased from Ebay:

  • Canon G10 at 720nm for $350 (G10’s are in high demand)
  • Canon G9 at 665nm for $300
  • Canon 10D at 850nm for $250
  • Olympus E-P1 at 720nm for $300
  • Canon 20D at 590nm that I picked up for $300.00!

Why you ask did I purchase all of these system?  Well I TEACH Infrared Workshops and as part of that I have loaner cameras so that my students can try different camera systems before they decide on what type of camera and what conversion they like the best!  But the real point that I am trying to make here is that YOU DO NOT have to spend a lot of money and that EBay is your friend!

Point and Shoot cameras are very inexpensive and are light and easy to carry.  This means that you will always have a IR system on hand.  Mirror-less SLR IR systems like the GH2 and OLY Pen systems give your the advantage of interchangeable lenses and are small and light.  DSLR IR systems have the advantage of being able to share lenses and accessories!  If you shoot Nikon, do not be afraid to buy a used Canon camera and a cheap lens and vice-versa!

Go back through this blog and read the posts on the 14 IR camera systems that I have tested!  You will notice that I tend towards smaller lighter and cheaper cameras!  There is a whole world out there full of people with IR systems that are upgrading to something newer and cooler (in their eyes!) who would jump at the chance to sell the old ones for funds to add to their new ones.

Beware of buying from friends in camera clubs as they are looking to recover ALL of the money they spent both for the camera as well as the conversion!  As I said EBay is your friend!

 

Leaving On A 2 Week Grist Mill Trip!


I Have Been So Busy It Hurts!

 

Wow, this past month has been a rush of work!  2 shows, a workshop and getting ready for this new trip from South Carolina to Boston to photograph Grist Mills and Covered Bridges!  I havent even had time to think about the blog!  Bad me…

Here is an image of what I am hunting….

St. Charles Mill, (St. Louis, Mo.) 630nm

Well, I promise that I will be better when I get back!

You are invited to the Low Country Infrared Adventure!


Jamie Konarski Davidson & Mark Hilliard
present an exciting, new Photographic Workshop &
Excursion Series on Fine Art Infrared Nature & Landscape Photography!

By Jamie Konarski Davidson

Come along with two of the most accomplished Infrared photographers on the Southeast coast for this energizing study of Fine Art Infrared (IR) photography! Learn about equipment needed for Infrared photography, what subjects  generate stunning IR images, and how to capture & process breathtaking IR images using this new digital technology.

By J.M. Hilliard

We will teach both Faux Color & traditional B&W post-processing techniques using Photoshop CS5, Elements 9 and Nik software. We will have several loaner IR camera systems for you to share if you do not yet own one!

Explore with us the rustic southern beauty of the Low Country. Along with two intense classroom sessions on Infrared Photography and post-processing, we will be shooting breathtaking land and seascapes in Pawleys Island and Brookgreen Gardens. In historic Georgtown we will capture local nautical themes, including the shrimp boat fleet and an ancient working boat yard where you will never know what you will find!

Infrared photography has become wildly popular in the past two years. It allows us to create new, different and emotionally intense images of things we see every day. Combine this capability with the stunning locations that we will be visiting, and you will understand why we are so excited to share this adventure with you.

Even if you do not currently have a Infrared camera  plan on attending! We will have loaner cameras for you to use as well as Infrared Filters to convert your current camera to Infrared!  This promises to be a great photographic experience for all!

By J.M. Hilliard

Tools For Infrared Post Processing


Or, How You Should Spend Your Money!

Abondened Car on Rt. 66. Canon G10 665 IR Conversion

Get a group of 10 photographers together in a group and ask “What editing software do you use?”  Chances are that you will get 3 answers, Photoshop CS#, Photoshop Elements # and Adobe Lightroom.  While all 3 have a useful place in the photographic community there are several fact that you must know when it comes to Infrared photography.

I will admit that I know literally nothing about Adobe Lightroom.  I had an evaluation copy of it when it first arrived on the scene and can tell you that I hated it with a passion.  It made no sense to me in its structure, GUI and inner working (OK, I guess that it means that I know 1 thing about it: I don’t like it!)  With that being said let’s list some of the editing tools and structures that we need for Infrared work:

  1. Advanced Editing features for spot cleanup and image repairs.  CS, Elements and likely Lightroom will fall into this one.
  2. Ability to work in 16 bit color space. CS for sure, Elements is very limited, couldn’t say about lightroom.
  3. Ability to run ACTIONS. CS only!
  4. Ability to run ALL of the NIK Software plugins.  CS, Elements and Lightroom.
  5. Totally Closed Loop Color System (Full ICC profile controls). CS only!
  6. Channel Mixer functionality. CS only!

OK, are you starting to see a pattern here?  Lets take a look at the most important functionality of your post processing software, creation of the Faux Color Infrared image!

  • For this you MUST have a channel mixer in order to swap the Red and Blue channels.  An added benefit would be to run a photoshop action in order to do this in an intelligent and automated fashion.  So, if you plan on doing any Faux Color work you MUST have some version of the full blown Photoshop CS family!
  • NIK filters are very important!  They allow us to take our Infrared Photography to their absolute best!  luckily, all of the Adobe products can act as a wrapper for NIK!
  • 16 Bit files and filters are very important for quality matters of colors and contrasts.  Doesn’t an image with 4.3 billion colors sound better than one with 16 million?  If so then you really need 16 bit functionality at least in the editing stages!
  • If you plan on doing your own printing then you need the ability of controlling your color space through specific targeted ICC profiles!  This is only fully implemented in the CS family!

Faux Color, Waccama River, Canon 20D, 590nm Conversion

You should consider your software just as important as your camera equipment.  Why spend thousands of dollars on cameras and lenses only to spend $79.00 on editing software?  It has always been a hard learned lesson for me thinking that I could buy cheap and upgrade to something better later on after I improved!  The truth of the matter is that money spent in this fashion was foolishly thrown away.  If you are actively pursuing a growing interest within the field of digital photography then you NEED the advanced post processing software tools from the very onset.  You will learn the tools the first time, have the necessary functionality as you grow in ability and never have to purchase them again in the future except in the form of upgrades! You can be shooting a dedicated Point & Shoot IR system and still need the advanced functionality that only CS and NIK can give you!

You have all read my lists on how to Post Process your images using Photoshop CS5, the Photoshop Channel Swap Action and NIK’s Define 2.0, Viveza 2.0, and Silver EFX.  You know how I create my images in frighting detail.  I am NOT saying that my was is the only way, but I believe that it is the BEST and Fastest way!

Other things that you can do to assist you in improving your photography are  to join clubs and groups with active outings and meetings!  Find like minded photographers in places like FaceBook.  Attach yourself to other photographers.  Send ME emails and comments here. If you have questions I will address them via a post here so that we can share with other like minded photographers! Take courses and workshops!  Pretty soon you will see that you have become an advanced photographer!

But no matter which direction you go keep at it.  Carry a camera with you and keep taking images! As long as you have the right Post Processing tools on hand they you will continue to advance your abilities!

Infrared Workshops & Excursions!


Basic and Advanced Infrared Workshops and Excursions are coming!

Seacoast Artist Guild in Pawleys Island, SC is sponsoring a 1 day Infrared Introduction workshop at The Lens Work Gallery  at the end of April.  You must be a member to attend. Please click on their link above to get more information.

Jamie Davidson and I are putting on a 3 day Low Country Infrared Adventure &  Workshop on July 8-10.  This will be centered in Pawleys Island but will include GREAT OUTINGS in and around the Low Country of South Carolina. It also will include two 1/2 day Advanced workshops that cover everything from equipment to printing but REALLY hit Post Processing FAUX COLOR and B&W Infrared Images!  More Info will be coming soon on this workshop.

Jamie and I  are also planing another similar Infrared Adventure in from Oct 30 thru Nov 2nd called The Inner Banks Infrared Adventure & Workshops that will take us down the Sound from Grenville, NC to the Outer Banks shooting shrimp boats and other nautical scenes! It also will include two 1/2 day Advanced workshops that cover everything from equipment to printing but REALLY hit Post Processing FAUX COLOR and B&W Infrared Images!  More Info will be coming soon on this workshop.

Lastly Vic & Lori Grbich and I are  in the beginning stages of planning a weekend Great 2011 Grist Mill Excursion this Fall to Pitkins, SC!  If you have read any of my posts here about grist mills and Infrared then you KNOW how excited I am about this trip!

Stay tuned for Info!

Spencers Camera IR Conversion Discounts


Coupon Code For $25.00 Off Your Future Orders!

Spencers Camera is giving any of my customers/readers a $25.00 discount on any Infrared Conversion if you order on their WEB page and enter the following coupon code:  hilliard25

Their WEB address is:
http://www.spencerscamera.com

I have had VERY GOOD service from these folks on the conversions on my Olympus PEN camera systems and have had 4 done so far with a 5th in process now!  They offer 830nm, 720nm, 665nm, 590nm and Full Spectrum Infrared conversions.  They offer conversions on so many different camera systems that it is impossible to list them here in a short post.